The Brocas area, the brain’s white matter, has great importance in cognitive functions and behavior. But why does it have this special importance? Is it because it is connected to a region known as the entorhinal cortex? Or is there another reason for this? One thing is for sure – if there is an anatomical link between the Brocas area and the entorhinal cortex, then a strong argument can be made that the area is involved in determining a person’s consciousness.

Researchers are now all agreed on one thing: the Brocas area is extremely important in human brain function. It is larger than the average section of the cortex. It has one of the greatest connections with the spinal cord and the brainstem. In fact, many researchers are convinced that it is the link to the cerebellum and periaqueductal gray matter that are responsible for some of our higher sensory and cognitive functions such as language, memory and attention. But what is the exact role it plays?

Researchers are now all agreed on one thing: the Brocas area is very important in human brain function. It is larger than the average section of the cortex. It has one of the greatest connections with the spinal cord and the brainstem. In fact, many researchers are convinced that it is the link to the cerebellum and periaqueductal gray matter that are responsible for some of our higher sensory and cognitive functions such as language, memory and attention | fluid | one} Why is this? Is the fluid in the arteries and veins where the Brocas fluid is found different from other parts of the brain? What does this have to do with my question? It helps explain one thing: During brain development, the fluid of the amygdala, one of the two glands that make anxiety regulation hormones, migrates from the amygdala to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which is part of the middle brain. This fluid is thought to act as a marker of where in the brain the anxious or fear-based memories reside. Now then, how might one go about using this knowledge to treat panic disorders?

In my work as a psychotherapist, I have seen tremendous benefits in patients who I have treated with cognitive behavioral therapy and those who just had panic attacks. In particular, I was very excited about learning that the Brocas area is located in the “amygdala’s” lateral section. I had heard that before and found it quite intriguing. The lateral section of the amygdala is actually where memories of events that may cause future fears or phobias are formed. The amygdala sends signals to the hypothalamus, which is responsible for your sense of smell and other types of behavior that relate to that area of the brain. Therefore, by treating a patient with cognitive behavioral therapy, we could use the lateral section of the amygdala as a target for odor and other behavior related treatments.

Unfortunately, none of these ideas have made any headway. However, I was recently informed by someone who had just completed a study on the Brocas area and the amygdala that the region does indeed contain a large number of olfactory neurons. Therefore, it may be possible to use the Brocas area to successfully treat anxiety disorders and smells related to them. This was a new idea to me but I am interested in hearing any thoughts you may have.


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